DAVID HYTONE

JANUARY 2020

David Hytone
Chewing the Scenery
acrylic, ink, flashe, okawara on panel
48" x 60"
2020
$ 7,000.

David Hytone
The Whole of the Half-Light
acrylic, ink, flashe, okawara on panel
28" x 24"
2019
$ 3,400.

David Hytone
Our Curious Arrangement
acrylic, ink, flashe, okawara on panel
39" x 52"
2019

S O L D

David Hytone
Woulda Shoulda Coulda
acrylic, ink, flashe, okawara on panel
46" x 38"
2019

S O L D

David Hytone
Fancier Pants
acrylic, ink, flashe, okawara on panel
40" x 38"
2020

S O L D

About the Exhibition

Friesen Gallery announces representation of David Hytone. Constructed from an improvisational blend of painting and collage, Hytone’s work examines human frailty and the mechanisms that we employ to cope and compensate for our limitations - imagined and otherwise. Using themes of theatre and still-life, he explores the space between the veneers of projection, facade and the actuality of things.

David Hytone received his BFA in Fine Arts from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design after studying briefly at the Osaka University of Arts in Osaka, Japan. He has previously exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in Seattle, San Francisco, Minneapolis, Portland, Tulsa, and his hometown of Des Moines, Iowa. A finalist for the 2018 Neddy Award in Painting, he has work in numerous private and corporate collections including Capital One, Swedish hospitals, Hilton and the permanent collection of King County, WA.

 

"I am interested in the intersection between specificity and approximation, particularly how this relationship informs our perception of the world around us and the role memory plays in that interface. The methods I utilize in the studio are the source of these inquiries, as the techniques often rely upon activities of transference and obfuscation, resulting in imagery that is compromised or incomplete, blending situational intentionality with generic cross-pollination. Repetition and the reoccurrence of patterns and thematic elements within a given composition and from piece to piece reference the sensory shorthand I believe we employ to navigate our surroundings and render our experiences onto memory. Theater and still-life have become useful lenses through which I project these ideas.

I’ve often said that when I enter the studio, I do not so much begin with an idea as endeavor to arrive at one, and allowing the process to lead my inquiries, as opposed to those inquiries driving my process is integral to keeping the work honest, revelatory and moving forward."
–DAVID HYTONE